Toward Outside Experts

Be polite.
Listen.
Be respectful.
Don’t get up and walk out
while they speak.
Use what you can.
Eventually they will leave.

Contributed by Howard F. Stein
From My Life. Georgetown, KY: Finishing Line Press, 2005. P. 24

Read the story behind the poem.

Emotions in the Learning Organization

Emotions in the Learning Organization

“Edward Hess on role of emotions in the learning organization.”

Committed to Ineffective Strategies?

Committed to Ineffective Strategies?

“Organizational blind spots arise when leadership and/or operational members in organizations are unable to acknowledge unworkable strategies.”

Late

Late

“Samuel hurried in and grabbed the first seat available. Having quickly sat down he slowly looked up. What was going to happen? To his relief the group leader welcomed him to the meeting as did others. “

What makes leadership “good enough”?

What makes leadership “good enough”?

“…the “good enough” leader (GEL), like the “good enough” mother, does not try to be obsessively and compulsively
perfect, machine-like, in his or her attunement with and response to the organisation…The “good enough” style of leadership contrasts with two culturally widespread and familiar styles of leadership…“hard” and “soft.”

5 Responses to “Toward Outside Experts”

  1. Michael Diamond says:

    Based on the language of the poem, how do we understand it’s meaning? How is psychoanalysis helpful in doing so? Of course, as individuals with a psychoanalytic attitude, we answer these questions somewhat different and probably somewhat similarly. For me, the language of poem as a vehicle conveying experience at work, I take Winnicott’s idea of the false self, compliant and inauthentic, as a product of traditional management’s obsession with control or what Eric Fromm referred to as the superior-inferior relationship, or what Jessica Benjamin, drawing from Hegel’s philosophy of master-slave relations, as dominance and submission at work. Regardless of which tool you select from the psychoanalytic chest, you are confronted with the moral violence in the workplace.

  2. Michael Diamond says:

    Upon further consideration, I agree with Donald Schon who in his book The Reflective Practitioner criticizes the notion of the “expert” and associates it with power and authority that simply work against any interest in learning and change. Thus, I encourage our students to think of themselves as bringing their naïveté to work, an open-mindedness and innocence that enables deep learning and listening, which then leads to compassion and understanding.

    • David Levine says:

      Naivete, innocence and compassion in place of expertise. I wonder what there is for us university professors to do and why we need graduate programs in administration or certificate programs in psychoanalysis.

  3. Michael Diamond says:

    I guess that depends on your assumptions about what university professors do and what graduate programs in administration or certificates in psychoanalysis do.

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