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  • Buddhism and Psychology of Self

    "In this paper, I will start by examining the concepts of self in psychoanalytic theory, arguing for a differentiation of these concepts on different levels of consciousness and abstraction. In the same section, I also discuss de nitions of narcissism, a concept closely connected to self. Then I will briefly describe the Buddhist theory of self in order to show how this can enrich psychoanalytic understanding of the experiential self, narcissism and therapeutic change."

  • Paradoxes of the Self

    "Moving back and forth between celebration of the private self and articulation of the impossibility of a one-person psychoanalysis, Modell’s quest to define the nature of the self has taken him from classical analytic theory, through Winnicott and object relations, to the philosophy of intersubjectivity and, in later years, to the work of infant researchers and neuroscientists."

  • Time and Reflexivity

    "If we are aware of the partiality of our accounts, then we need to find out in what ways we are partial, how our accounts incorporate assumptions of which we are not ordinarily aware - we need, in other words, to reflect on our reflections; we need to be reflexive. Moreover, if it is accepted that the observer is not detached from the system observed, then the observer should indeed get as close to the system as possible, for, only in that way, will its internal life and development be properly understood."

  • Mind as Instrument

    Mind as Instrument

    "While psychoanalytic observation of institutions is, first of all, a method of training for psychiatrists and more recently for institutional consultants and social scientists, he argues that institutional observation can also be used as a research method, for single case studies, as well as for wider studies."

  • Struggling with Lack

    "The purpose of this paper is to contribute to research on organizational identity by developing a psychoanalytic perspective. In particular, the author draws on Lacanian theorizing to explore how organizational identity discourse is informed by imaginary constructions of subjectivity."