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  • Management vs Expertise

    The Atlantic recently did a piece that delved into the human brain’s bias against novelty, citing in particular communications experts’ predictions that the iPhone would be a total flop. The article explores the idea that as people become more knowledgeable in a certain field, they are less inclined to accept new ideas even when creativity is the stated goal.

  • To Look or not to Look

    "Here we study how rationality can be used in the service of irrationality. In particular, rationalized, engineered and bureaucratically organized inputs, throughputs, and outputs contain unconscious processes embodied in the engineering of atrocity."

  • Challenges and Dynamics in Multiparty Collaboration

    Challenges and Dynamics in Multiparty Collaboration

    "This article gives a rich and vivid account of a collaborative process in the domain of foster care. Five foster care organizations tried to move from a competitive relationship toward structural collaboration in the interest of foster children and their parents. The article explores, with the system psychodynamic perspective in mind, which dynamics emerged around those issues."

  • Imagining Organizations

    "Heightened by economic pressures to remain competitive, organizational survival is linked increasingly to organizations’ ability to call upon their employees’ creative imaginations...Organizations are expected not only to mobilize their imaginations for producing innovation and novelty but also to ‘imagine differently’...The way in which we imagine the organizations we inhabit...has a concrete effect on the actions we take within them when pursuing our individual goals and organizational objectives."

  • Psychological Solutions to Unemployment: A Critique

    "The rationale for attempting to improve access to psychological therapies for the un(der)employed and socially excluded—that for the purposes of this article I call the work-less and the worth-less respectively—is that it is they, rather than the socio-economic and political structures that construct them that is ‘the problem’. "